Film Review: IMDbinge - Zootropolis (2016)

Film Review: IMDbinge - Zootropolis (2016)

Catherine's 2016 Challenge - watch all 250 of IMDb's top rated films. Today she reviews new Disney release, now currently no. 135 on the list.

Zootropolis is the film that today’s kids desperately need to see.

For anyone who thought that Disney were running out of creative steam, maybe for lack of adaptable content or competition from other studios, Zootropolis – along with a string of promising releases set for 2016 - will most certainly prove them wrong.

My dad asked me if there was anything worth seeing at the cinema this weekend and by that logic we ruled out Batman vs. Superman but seriously considered Ben Wheatley’s High Rise and ending up settling on Zootropolis – partly because it had made its way into the top 250 and had great reviews, and partly by general consensus. I am normally relatively sceptical of any new release that jumps into the top 250 on its release as more often than not they fall out again pretty quickly. Films such as Gravity, Drive and The Social Network were all in the list at the height of their popularity and have unfortunately come crashing back down, whether they deserve it or not but I have a good feeling about Zootropolis. The list is, after all, by no means a perfect system for actually gauging which are the best films out there.

But let’s get to the meaty bit. It may just be that I’m still reeling over it - and I anticipate that the frenzy over this film hasn’t even begun yet – but I don’t think it’s too bold to say that this film will go down in history with Toy Story and Finding Nemo. Not only does it have that appeal to adults that kid’s films so often lack, it is also intelligent, funny and chock full of amusing references. The film follows the cute but sassy Judy Hopps (Ginnifer Goodwin), a bunny from the country who is trying to make it in the big city as a cop and her journey of finding out what it means to make the world a better place. As she battles with her parents, her colleagues and her superiors, she finds help with a fox called Nick. 

There are a few unexpected twists and turns and the film does pretty well at avoiding predictability, but the most interesting thing about it is how its themes tie so unequivocally to situations and prejudices we are seeing in the world right now. The distinction between predators (who are in the minority) and prey is made right from the outset and although they appear to live in harmony there are those who want you to fear the predators for political gain. The highlighting of how easy it is to control people with fear is a poignant lesson and, in a world currently raging with racism and xenophobia, one that the next generation need so desperately to learn.

Zootropolis has jumped to no. 135 after release on 25th March. It is available to see in cinemas across the UK.

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