Body On Me: Artist Interview – Manu Ridocci

Body On Me: Artist Interview – Manu Ridocci

Manu Ridocci is a London based art director specialised in photography and design. He has studied graphic design and photography in Madrid, Spain and and has worked as a freelancer in both fields since 2008 developing both personal and commercial projects. In 2013 Manu was finalist at Absolut Porfolios: New Talents of Photography, selected for Entrefotos for the best 2013 projects and he receive a Laus Award for the photography in Cookbook Magazine. Since 2014 he works with Marion May for Josie Magazine. His client list includes companies such as Rolls-Royce, Google, Amnesty International, Boots, Santander, Shoop clothing, Abrahamsson and Sony among others.

Can you tell us about your work and what you do?
My approach to photography is really about trying to describe the feelings of love more related to encounters - making love really. I could say sex but it’s more related to feelings. Describing the feelings of the skin, the temperature. It’s more about sensations and more in an abstract way playing with different compositions and describe with the shapes shadows. That’s it really.

Where do you draw inspiration from?
Mostly films, movies and different stories in books. Everywhere really. Sometimes you find inspiration on the internet or you just having a look and thenI think mostly the light is playing an important role, the light around us when it is a sunny day the way the light is [creating] different shapes on the floor and through the trees and even buildings. The way its playing with shapes and colours is interesting to me.

 

Your work is very intimate. How do you tackle the issue of vulnerability in front of the lens?
That’s interesting because the approach I’m trying to do for my work is from the first person. So it kind of looks like you could be there in the actual situation having sex or making love. So they are quite close up so it takes a while to have that approach and the model needs to be quite relaxed. It takes some time just playing with some shapes and movement from positions and how the light is throwing [shapes], this kind of thing. Yeah, it just takes time and I wait for the model to feel comfortable. I mean, that’s why the light plays a really important role because they could feel like there is sex or love needed but it’s not really happening it’s just making it look like that’s happening.

Mattel have recently released Barbie dolls in a variety of body types. How much do mainstream attitudes towards body image affect your work?
I’m trying to run away from that in a way because there is from the last two years, there is a lot of eroticism around and I try to to not get to much influence [from] what’s going on around otherwise everything starts to look quite similar. So I’m trying to have a different approach from that that’s why I try to take less inspiration from the internet and mainstream and more from nature.

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